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Fact vs. Fiction: Debunking Sports Injury Myths

Don’t believe everything you hear. This old adage also rings true when it comes to sports injuries. You’ve probably encountered a few coaches or friends who are sure they know exactly what your injury is, why you have it and how to treat it. Following are a few common sports injury myths and the truth behind them.

Following ACL reconstruction and recovery, the knee will be stronger than it was prior to the injury. Unfortunately, this is simply not true. Your original ACL will always be stronger than a replacement. Your natural tissues will always support your knee more effectively. However, if the procedure and recovery goes well, a replacement can develop comparable strength.

Curveballs cause injury in young pitchers. In reality, poor technique and overuse more likely causes injury in young pitchers. It’s not throwing a particular pitch that puts a player at risk. It’s that certain pitches are more difficult to execute properly.

Heat after an injury will help with healing. This isn’t always true. Check out this blog post, which debates whether ice or heat is more effective in relieving the symptoms associated with injury. You should never apply heat to a swollen or inflamed injury.

If you have shin splints, you should run on them until the pain subsides. Shin splints are usually the result of overuse and should be treated with rest, ice and anti-inflammatory medication. When you return to running, look into preventative measures, such as key stretches and making sure your shoes fit and are compatible to your foot-type.

Remember that every injury is different and your best bet is to speak to a physician if you have a sports injury that will not go away.

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